Kinshasa is a performance. In the mega-city with more than 12 million inhabitants and the most glaring inequalities on the planet, survival has become a daily art.

Since its inception, Kinshasa has suffered the social and economic consequences of an increasingly globalised market. The economic predation suffered by the DRC for decades, does not by itself adequately explain the complexity of the realities experienced by the Congolese in the capital today.


 

However, its disparities have generated, in spite of itself, a form of social reorganisation that has consequentially resulted in the emergence of an abundant cultural scene.
Performance art took to the streets of Kinshasa in the early 2000s. In small steps, artists from the Academy of Fine Arts, connected to professionals around the world, took possession of the public space to denounce the evils of everyday life.

In two decades, this scene has deeply evolved. The artists of a new generation are ‘returning fire’; a response to the onslaught of excessive consumption. By denouncing the pollution, omnipresent in the Congolese capital, and its causes: the overconsumption of plastic, the bad management of public affairs and the lack of education, these artists are taking a stand.
In these neighbourhoods of Kinshasa, where everything is lacking, artists have reimagine their city and awakened contemporary myths that question our modernity.


 

In these neighbourhoods of Kinshasa, where everything is lacking, artists have reimagine their city and awakened contemporary myths that question our modernity.